1
HTML Widget
Membership
Calendar
Rapid Raid
Recent Images
Facebook
1
 
RSS Feed
 
the Battle of Evermore

 

 

 

 

"The Battle of Evermore" and Tolkien

 

The Battle of Evermore" is an acoustic guitar and mandolin track from Led Zeppelin's fourth album.

It is commonly believed to be based on events in J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings' final volume, The Return of the King.

In the most common interpretation, the Prince of Peace, who "embraced the gloom" and "walked the night alone", refers to Frodo, who left the Fellowship of the Ring and left for Mordor with only his servant and friend Samwise Gamgee for company. "The Queen of Light" who "took her bow" is taken to refer to Galadriel, a queen of the Elves, signifying that the Third Age is ending and that the Age of Men will begin soon. Other interpretations of how the lyrics relate to Tolkien exist: one example has the "Prince of Peace" referring to Aragorn. Probably the song's most compelling link to Tolkien is the lyric: "The Ringwraiths ride in black", a Tolkien invention.

 

Led Zeppelin - Battle of Evermore

^ Click here ^


 

 


 

"Battle of Evermore" Lyrics

 

 

Queen of Light took her bow
And then she turned to go,
The Prince of Peace embraced the gloom
And walked the night alone.

 

 

Oh, dance in the dark of night,
Sing to the morn-ing light.
The dark Lord rides in force tonight
And time will tell us all.

 

 

Oh, throw down your plow and hoe,
Rest not to lock your homes.
Side by side we wait the might
Of the darkest of them all.

 

 

I hear the horses' thunder
Down in the valley below,
I'm waiting for the angels of Avalon,
Waiting for the eastern glow.

 

 

The apples of the valley hold
The seeds of happiness,
The ground is rich from tender care,
Repay, do not forget, no, no.
Oh, dance in the dark of night,
Sing to the morning light.

 

 

The apples turn to brown and black,
The tyrant's face is red.

 

 

Oh the war is common cry,
Pick up you swords and fly.
The sky is filled with good and bad
That mortals never know.

 

 

Oh, well, the night is long
The beads of time pass slow,
Tired eyes on the sunrise,
Waiting for the eastern glow.

 

 

The pain of war cannot exceed
The woe of aftermath,
The drums will shake the castle wall,
The ringwraiths ride in black,
Ride on.

 

 

Sing as you raise your bow,
Shoot straighter than before.
No comfort has the fire at night
That lights the face so cold.

 

 

Oh dance in the dark of night,
Sing to the mornin' light.
The magic runes are writ in gold
To bring the balance back.
Bring it back.

 

 

At last the sun is shining,
The clouds of blue roll by,
With flames from the dragon of darkness
The sunlight blinds his eyes.

 


With the help of Matt Faulhaber, I have assertained that "Battle" is solely based upon the events surrounding the Battle of Pelennor Fields from Return of the King. The time span of the song encompasses events in the novel from Aragorn's parting for the Paths of the Dead until the end of the Battle of Pelennor Fields.

 


 

Queen of Light took her bow
And then she turned to go,
The Prince of Peace embraced the gloom
And walked the night alone.

 



The Queen of Light is Eowyn, who bids Aragorn goodbye and then turns to join the Rohan army. The Prince of Peace is Aragorn, and he embraces the gloom of the Paths of the dead.

 


 

Oh, dance in the dark of night,
Sing to the morn-ing light.
The dark Lord rides in force tonight
And time will tell us all.

 



Obviously, either Sauron or the Leader of the Ringwraiths is the said dark Lord.

 


 

 

Oh, throw down your plow and hoe,
Rest not to lock your homes.
Side by side we wait the might
Of the darkest of them all.

 



At the start of the seige of Gondor, the workers on the fields flee to the Tower for protection. Then, the citizens watch and wait for the onslaught of Mordor to arrive.

 


 

I hear the horses' thunder
Down in the valley below,
I'm waiting for the angels of Avalon,
Waiting for the eastern glow.

 



This is self-explanatory. Curiously, though, there is no mention of Avalon in any of Tolkien's works.

 


 

 

The apples of the valley hold
The seeds of happiness,
The ground is rich from tender care,
Repay, do not forget, no, no.
Oh, dance in the dark of night,
Sing to the morning light.

The apples turn to brown and black,
The tyrant's face is red.

 

Oh, well, the night is long
The beads of time pass slow,
Tired eyes on the sunrise,
Waiting for the eastern glow.

 



Another self-explanatory line, speaking of the soldiers waiting for the blackness of Mordor to fall away.

 


The pain of war cannot exceed
The woe of aftermath,
The drums will shake the castle wall,
The ringwraiths ride in black,
Ride on.

 



The use of the term"ringwraith" is the concrete evidence of this song's relation to Tolkien, since JRR Tolkien coined the particular word.

 


 

Sing as you raise your bow,
Shoot straighter than before.
No comfort has the fire at night
That lights the face so cold.

 



Gondor begins to fall behind some as the battle progresses, and they all know something dramatic must occur for their victory to take place.

 


 

 

Oh dance in the dark of night,
Sing to the mornin' light.
The magic runes are writ in gold
To bring the balance back.
Bring it back.

 



There are two schools of thought on this line. Frodo's Ring has magic runes, and when it is destroyed, the balance of power in the world is restored. Also, Merry's sword has runes written on it, and his stabbing the Leader of the Ringwraiths restores the balance of power in the battle.

 


 

 

At last the sun is shining,
The clouds of blue roll by,
With flames from the dragon of darkness
The sunlight blinds his eyes.

 



The first half of this verse talks about how, when the battle is won, the sky clears again, as the blackness of Mordor again retreats to its homeland. The second half remains a mystery. It is most likely stating metaphorically that Sauron's army must retreat as the sun rises again.

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
Site Search Widget
Site Contributions
User Recognition
HTML Widget
Poll Widget
1